GERHARDSEN GERNER

Berlin Oslo Artists Artfairs


JIM LAMBIE

Biography

Bibliography

Previous Shows


Previous Shows


Jim Lambie – La scala (2016)

Jim Lambie (2012)

Jim Lambie – Rowche Rumble (2008)




Jim Lambie Technodelic (Infinite fries) (2016) Potato bags, expanding foam, chrome paint on canvas
approx. H 214 x W 188.5 x D 67.5 cm


Jim Lambie Soul Machine (2016) Potato bags, expanding foam, chrome paint on canvas approx. H 210 x W 178.5 x D 72 cm


Jim Lambie Purple Rain (2016) Potato bags, expanding foam, chrome paint on canvas approx. H 94 x W 71.5 x D 58 cm


Jim Lambie Hot Chips (2016) Potato bags, expanding foam, chrome paint on canvas approx. H 96.5 x W 74 x D 59 cm


Jim Lambie Half Moon Kool Breeze (2016) Potato bags, expanding foam, chrome paint on canvas
approx. H 101 x W 69.5 x D 56 cm


Jim Lambie The Ballad of Buffalo Gals (La Scala) (2016) Lacquered aluminium, customised boombox with found objects, chair seat, clothing rags, safety pins
approx. 320 x 120 x 60 cm


Jim Lambie The Ballad of Buffalo Gals (La Scala) (2016) detail


Jim Lambie The Ballad of Buffalo Gals (La Scala) (2016) detail


Jim Lambie Teardrop Boombox (La Scala) (2016) Lacquered aluminium, spoons, coloured paint pigment, cast rubber boombox approx. 270 x 180 x 60 cm;
boombox rubber casts approx. 40 x 35 x 15 cm


Jim Lambie Teardrop Boombox (La Scala) (2016) detail


Jim Lambie Teardrop Boombox (La Scala) (2016)


Jim Lambie Cosmic Vortex (Deeper and Deeper) (2016) Found sofa, aluminium tape, rubber bicycle inside tubings, wire,
rotary motor Sofa approx. 200 x 100 x 85 cm inner tubes object approx. 150 x 140 x 120 cm


Jim Lambie Cosmic Vortex (Deeper and Deeper) (2016) detail


Jim Lambie Infrared (2016) Shoes, gloss paint, safety pins, gaffa tape, black straws approx. 266 x D 60 cm

 




Jim Lambie
La Scala

Exhibition duration:    April 29 – May 2016


Gerhardsen Gerner is pleased to announce the Scottish artist Jim Lambie’s second solo show with Gerhardsen Gerner in the Berlin gallery on the occasion of the GALLERY WEEKEND BERLIN 2016. For this event the musicians Parra for Cuva and the duo Trash Lagoon, both based in Berlin, will release a new LP. The record is also an art work by Jim Lambie, who designed the cover.

Sourcing his material directly from the modern world, Jim Lambie references popular culture, often drawing his subject matter from music and iconic figures. He makes use of everyday objects and materials – both as reference points and as original objects, transforming them into new sculptural forms, re-energizing them and giving them with an alternative function. With each element constructed from found objects he creates sculptures that are steeped in the spirit of the UK punk explosion with garish tones, bold display, and references to both bands and songs from an array of movements.

Lambie explores the potential of everyday materials and objects sourced from charity shops, like old suitcases, mirrors and popular books, as well as industrially manufactured materials like gaffer tape and potato bags. This use of ordinary objects reflects the DIY nature of the post-punk scene, where zealous participants created a subculture out of materials that were perceived as broken, obsolete, or undesirable. In his sculptures and installations, he embraces each object’s right to meaning while also prioritizing the act of looking. His works acknowledge that the viewer comes with an understanding, a pre-existing history with the component materials that adds to their experience of it as an artwork. According to Lambie, the things we recognize—paint, potato bags, color— “set up a reverberation between them and our possibly unconscious previous visual experience with them. These works don’t want to create a new world into which we can escape, they want to bounce the world back to us, encouraging us to look at it again.”

Jim Lambie's approach to art making is informed by a few fundamental ideas. A rock musician before he became a visual artist, he uses color in a way that is deeply rooted in color theory and specifically relates to the concept of synesthesia, an analogous experience between music and the color spectrum in which the stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. Colors are harmonies and pattern and repetition form rhythms.

Different from his rather esoteric predecessors, Lambie?s choice of color composition is determined by a sense of directness and everyday availability. The modern world seems his source and palette. Which sheds light onto Lambie?s other basic feature, his Glaswegian origin. Lambie is deeply immersed in the history of a place characterized by the tension between industrialization and liberation movements such as William Morris? utopianism and socialism and the Arts and Crafts movement at large. The Glasgow School of Art, designed by Scottish architect and fellow Arts and Crafts member Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and also Lambie?s place of study, is an incarnation of such utopian ideas. Echoing Mackintosh, Lambie?s concern is to build around the needs of people: people seen, not as masses, but as individuals who needed not a machine for living in but a work of art. Lambie shows how we can maintain a sense of self in an over-commodified world of sameness.

Jim Lambie (b.1964, Glasgow) is most well known for his mixed-media sculptures and dazzling floor installations using industrial materials, found objects, and other cultural detritus. He represented Scotland’s inaugural pavilion at the 2003 Venice Biennale and was nominated for the 2005 Turner Prize.

Recent solo exhibitions include Zero Concerto, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney; Sun Rise, Sun Ra, Sun Set, Rat Hole Gallery, Tokyo; Answer Machine, Sadie Coles HQ, London; and The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh.
Recent group shows include Eyes on the Prize, The Travelling Gallery, Various cities (Turner Prize); Summer Exhibition 2015, The Royal Academy of Arts London; A Secret Affair: Selections from the Fuhrman Family, FLAG Art Foundation, New York; 20 Years of Collecting: Between Discovery and Invention, Zabludowicz Collection, London; Color Fields, Bakalar & Paine Galleries, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston; Schlaflos – Das Bett in Geschichte und Gegenwartskunst, Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, 21er Haus, Vienna; Private Utopia: Contemporary Works from the British Council Collection, Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art, Okayama.

Lambie’s work is represented in institutional and private collections worldwide, including The Pace Foundation, San Antonio; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington; Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow; Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz, Miami; Rubell Family Collection, Miami; Scottish National Gallery of Art, Edinburgh; and TATE, London.

For further information please contact Maike Fries at Gerhardsen Gerner, Berlin: T: +49-30-69 51 83 41,  
office@gerhardsengerner.com or visit our website at http://www.gerhardsengerner.com
- - - -

 

Jim Lambie
La Scala

Ausstellungsdauer:    29. April – Mai, 2016

 

Gerhardsen Gerner freut sich sehr, in der Berliner Galerie zum GALLERY WEEKEND BERLIN die zweite Einzelausstellung mit dem schottischen Künstler Jim Lambie ankündigen zu können. Die Berliner Musiker Parra for Cuva und das Duo Trashlagoon werden zu diesem Anlass eine neue Schallplatte veröffentlichen. Die Platte ist ein Kunstwerk von Jim Lambie, der das Plattencover gestaltet hat.

Jim Lambie bezieht sich in seiner Arbeitsweise auf die heutige, moderne Welt und setzt allerlei Verweise zur Pop-Kultur, vor allem Musik und Popikonen charakterisieren sein Schaffen. Er verwendet Alltagsobjekte und –materialien, überführt sie als Skulpturen in den Bereich der Kunst, und verleiht ihnen so eine alternative Funktion. Aus Teilen der vorgefundenen Materialien schafft der Künstler, vom Geist der britischen Punktbewegung durchdrungene Skulpturen: grelle Farbschattierungen, gewagte Präsentation und eine Bandbreite von Referenzen zu Musikgruppen sowie Songs aus zahlreichen Musikstilen.

Alte Koffer, Spiegel oder Bücher aus der Sparte der Trashliteratur, aber auch industriell gefertigte Materialien wie Duct-tape und Kartoffelsäcke: Lambie erkundet das überwältigende Potential der, gerne in Second-Hand–Läden gefundenen  Alltagsobjekte. Seine Herangehensweise spiegelt die Do-it-Yourself Haltung der post-punk Szene, deren Mitglieder eine Subkultur geschaffen haben, die sich über kaputte, veraltete oder schlichtweg hässliche Materialien definieren. So feiert Lambie mit seinen Skulpturen und Installationen das Recht jedes Objektes auf Bedeutung und priorisiert den Vorgang des Sehens. Das Werk des Künstlers räumt den Vorstellungen des Betrachters und der Geschichte der verwendeten Materialien Platz ein und lässt dies in die Erfahrung des Betrachters mit dem Kunstwerk miteinfließen. Lambie findet, dass die Dinge, die wir wahrnehmen – Farbe, Kartoffelsäcke, Farbschattierungen – „zwischen sich und unserer, möglicherweise vorausgegangenen, unbewussten visuellen Erfahrung eine Resonanz bilden. Diese Werke wollen keine neue Welt erschaffen, in welche wir uns flüchten können, sie möchten die Welt in unsere Richtung bringen und uns so dazu ermutigen, nochmals hinzuschauen.“

Jim Lambies Herangehensweise an das Kunstschaffen ist von einigen wenigen, wichtigen Ideen geprägt. Lambie war, bevor er bildender Künstler wurde, Musiker. Farbe nutzt der Künstler gemäß der Farbtheorie und bezieht sich auf das Konzept der Synästhesie, ein analoges Verfahren zwischen Musik und dem Farbspektrum, in welchem die Stimulation einer bestimmten, sensorischen oder kognitiven Bahn zu automatischer, unbewusster Erfahrung auf einer zweiten, sensorischen oder kognitiven Bahn führt. Farben formen Harmonien und  Muster, Wiederholungen werden zu Rhythmen.

Im Unterschied zu seinen eher esoterischen Vorgängern geht Lambies Wahl der Farbkompositionen von der Unmittelbarkeit und alltäglichen Verfügbarkeit aus. Die moderne Welt dient sowohl als Inspirationsquelle als auch Palette. Dieser Punkt führt hin zu Lambies anderer wichtiger Besonderheit: seine Glasgower Herkunft. Der Künstler ist tief verwurzelt in der Geschichte dieses, damals von Industrialisierung und Befreiungsbewegungen wie den Sozialutopien von William Morris oder der gesamten Arts & Crafts Bewegung gespaltenen Ortes. Die Glasgow School of Art, von schottischen Architekten und Arts & Crafts Anhänger Rennie Mackintosh entworfen und auch Lambies Ausbildungsort, ist eine Brutstätte solcher utopistischer Ideen. Im Sinne Mackintoshs ist es auch Lambies Anliegen, die Bedürfnisse der Menschen in den Mittelpunkt zu rücken: die Menschen sollen nicht als Masse, sondern als Individuen gesehen werden, die keine Maschine zum Leben brauchen, sondern ein Kunstwerk. Lambie macht vor wie wir in dieser über-kommerzialisierten Welt des Eintönigkeit und des Immergleichen ein Gefühl für uns selbst bewahren können.

Jim Lambie (1964 in Glasgow geboren) ist bekannt geworden mit seinen mixed-media Skulpturen und beeindruckenden Fußboden-Installationen, für die er industrielle Materialien, vorgefundene Objekte und anderen kulturell aufgeladenen Detritus nutzt. Im Jahr 2003 war er Vertreter Schottlands auf der Biennale von Venedig und 2005 wurde er für den Turner Preis nominiert.

Einzelausstellungen: Zero Concerto, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney; Sun Rise, Sun Ra, Sun Set, Rat Hole Gallery, Tokyo; Answer Machine, Sadie Coles HQ, London; and The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh.

Gruppenausstellungen: Eyes on the Prize, The Travelling Gallery, Various cities (Turner Prize); Summer Exhibition 2015, The Royal Academy of Arts London; A Secret Affair: Selections from the Fuhrman Family, FLAG Art Foundation, New York; 20 Years of Collecting: Between Discovery and Invention, Zabludowicz Collection, London; Color Fields, Bakalar & Paine Galleries, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston; Schlaflos – Das Bett in Geschichte und Gegenwartskunst, Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, 21er Haus, Vienna; Private Utopia: Contemporary Works from the British Council Collection, Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art, Okayama.

Lambies Werke sind in zahlreichen institutiuonen und privaten Sammlungen vertreten, darunter The Pace Foundation, San Antonio; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington; Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow; Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz, Miami; Rubell Family Collection, Miami; Scottish National Gallery of Art, Edinburgh; and TATE, London.

Für weitere Informationen oder Abbildungsmaterialien kontaktieren sie bitte  Maike Fries, Gerhardsen Gerner:
T: +49-30-69 51 83 41, E: office@gerhardsengerner.com oder besuchen Sie unsere Website unter http://www.gerhardsengerner.com.